About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
MSNBCW 8
CSPAN 3
MSNBC 3
CNBC 2
CNNW 2
FBC 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
CNN 1
CSPAN2 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
2. both he and john paul ii saw their papacies an attempt to interpret vatican too properly. not so much a modernization of the church, vatican ii was an evangelical missionary council. to some degree modernizing to make the church a more apt meaning to that. hence the wide travel for example of john paul ii, hence the great teaching of benedict xvi. i think that's his major legacy. >> they're very different at least in their style and in their i guess pastor abilities in some way, although not very different philosophically. >> this has been a really unsuccessful papacy and the greatest single act of his papacy is that our church is in real trouble and i am not able to cope with the trouble that we're in. i think there are some of the cardinals that are hoping that the next pope that they elect will convene a vatican 3, something that will set the church on a new course, reach out to the modern world, instead of what has happened under john paul ii as well in terms of the theology and benedict which has been a look backwards in terms of what the theology means, what the role of the
wanted to retire when he worked for john paul ii, asked him, john 35u8 ii, would not let that happen. he became pope after john paul ii died, but he never seemed to enjoy it the way john paul ii did, who was an actor. benedict is a scholar, a theologian, an intellectual, and today you could see the humility that those who know him very well say have always marked this 85-year-old man. >> certainly describing himself as a pilgrim is really extraordinary, and you get the feeling that the crowd, the audiences were responding to him in an emotional way that they hadn't previously. that i guess it's the moment the history, but also the sadness. i mean, this is a very bittersweet moment. >> well, it's -- it is. that's exactly the way to describe it. you know, it's interesting in st. peters square, they had the big jumbotrons out there, and people were gathered around and were actually silent in st. peters square watching what happened, and the last time i heard that kind of silence in st. peters square it was when they announced the death of john paul ii. you never heard a cell phone go off. y
, scalia for testimonying it like it is. nnext pope john paul ii shock happened the catholic church and the rest of the world when he made this announcement this week. >> after examined my conscious before god i came to a certainty my strength due to advanced age are no longer suited to the adequate exercise of the ministry. >> it was a remarkable announcement, first pope in over 600 years to actually step aside instead of leaving the papacy in the point much death. i want to say thank you, pope john paul ii . the reason why, as i would say thanks to your predecessor pope john paul ii. this is it a evangelical and not a catholic who appreciates the firm convictions of the catholic church and popes who decipeded that the purpose of the church is not a mere thermometer reflecting the culture of whatever the world happens to believe in the given moment, but believes that the church is to be the thermostat that can read the culture that is it prevalent in the world, but whose purpose is to adjust the temperature of the culture to what it ought to be . for that, i say thank you for faith
this happened eight years ago when john paul died. you have this uncertainty. but you also have this other thing which is entirely new. 8:00 tonight, it's over. >> and to a certain extent, the pope and his cardinals are writing the rule books as we go along. one of these issues is, how much fanfare does the pope want as he says his good-bye. we saw the final audience yesterday. he had this emotional meeting with the cardinals this morning. is this the good-bye that he wanted? >> this is the good-bye, definitely. i mean, the people cheering right now are people in the secular state who work where i do. just two floors above where they are, the domicile. i think it's important that they were able to say good-bye. they didn't want anything huge. he had that with the audience. he's not somebody that likes big celebrations in general. i think it's only right that the people who worked with him, his clollaborators got to give him sendoff. >> as we watch his ride to the top of the hill to a white helicopter. a short ride to castel gandolfo, about 20 miles out of rome, it's his residence. and then the p
's -- he succeeded pope john paul ii who was extremely popular and who reigned for over 20 years and did extensive amounts of traveling endured especially by young -- endeared especially by young people and there was an assassination attempt on him and he forgave the person who wanted it three to -- who wanted to try to shoot hill. it's been an interesting reign for the pope. it's just about to end. >> they say many at the vatican were stunned by the news he was resigning. there were others who saw it as a sign of humility and humanity, a fact that he was being rationle that he didn't feel he would -- rational, that he didn't feel he would do the job anymore. >> and there were concerns that he couldn't deal with some of the scandals that started to rock the catholic church. he just maintained it was for his health and purely humble reasons that he wanted to step down and step april side. once again, a -- aside. once again a beautiful picture from the helipad. which i guess you don't see very often outside of the vatican, outside of the walls of vatican. >> as we watch these live picture,
remember how pope john paul ii was so young when he was elected. i think he was 56 or 57. a young man. >> he used to go skiing all the time. >> he was elected when he was 78 years old. >> yeah. so we watched him turn into an elderly man that was very frail. remember how long it took, we waited and waited. i can remember i was on a plane when he finally passed. but he didn't -- i mean, he was not healthy at the end and he didn't resign. so that's what i don't really understand, ross, right? >> well, traditionally, they haven't resigned. so -- >> 1415, yeah. >> so he's 2005, he's 86. so that's five, six, seven, eight -- >> i think what we're all dancing around the issue of whether or not there's more to it, right? is that what we're getting at? >> is there something else we don't know about. >> all of them have gotten elderly and they have essentially died in office and that's when they begin to look for a new pope. that is no happening in this case. >> right. you said it would be pure speculation. it's probably best not to specula speculate, at least you filled us in that at this point
, coming in as the oldest pope to be elected, nominated to the job following the footsteps of pope john paul ii who of course was terribly charismatic and loved but the pope benedict filled in a lot, traveling a lot and helping with important issues in the church. in a month or so we'll have a new pope, tracy. tracy: amy kellogg. this is historical stuff. father john was on "fox & friends." very humbling that he admitted he can't do it. he has got to step down. ashley: has to take courage has not been 600 years since a pope done that. tracy: he would have gotten away staying to the end. ashley: maybe but he doesn't want. a film critic blasting the star of a new hollywood hit for being fat. that is not stopping her from guiding this film to victory in this weekend's box-office. dennis kneale on the story joins us now. dennis. >> sweet vindication for melissa mccarthy. the rotund and rambunctious comic actress in first starring role, in the universal film, identity thief. this on the road comedy dominated weekend box-office with a robust 30 significance million take. far higher than forec
the last pope, one that we knew growing up, pope john paul ii, literally allowed the world to watch him die. that was part of the process of sharing life, willie. >> yeah. this pope says he's old and fragile, unable to travel, but you make a good point about the previous pope. john, we've heard many times now that the next pope, whoever that may be, will have to confront the sexual abuse scandal, puts it mildly. that has consumed the roman catholic church for so long. what will that mean exactly? what will a pope do? a new pope in terms of confronting that? will he come out immediately in an opening address? will he purge some of the priests? what do you think that pope will do at least from a public relations point of view to change the perception? >> well, it's the perception and the reality. it's the most disturbing thing about any self-protecting institution. you see this as the catholic chump has, for decade upon decade now, put its own institutional survival and its own institutional dignity, really, ahead of the interests of the weakest people in its care, its children. i think many
by his predecessor john paul ii. they will look for somebody who will continue the same ol' outdated policies. with this new conclave, you may get a new face for the catholic church, but it will be the same ol' stuff. and it ain't goting to work. see you back here go ahead on monday. >> this is "the bill press show." ♪ theme ♪ stephanie: ok, then, hello happy friday, everybody. jacki sheckner had to do an emergency valentine's day intervention last night. >> yeah. stephanie: we were having a rough valentine. however, we did not just get off a carnival cruise ship. >> so you're not covered in crap. stephanie: emotionally i am. >> i did administer tough love. stephanie: that's what you're good at. >> get over it. stephanie: get off the cross somebody needs the wood. >> she always feels good calling me and then whatever, get off the phone. stephanie: i get my tough love and i know she's got other people to move on to. >> pity party we wrap it up. stephanie: we're on a schedule here. stephanie: b.f.f. in the current news center, jacki sheckner. >> president obama will welco
in 1996 by pope john paul ii and can only be changed by another pope. that is what benedict did at that. one of his last official acts. the pope gave his final sunday blessing to huge crowds in st. peter's square. no date has been set for the con chraf to begin, in order to to have a new pope by march 24th. the new pope would have to be installed by sunday, march 17th. hence why they had to get permission to move up the date. martha: everything moving forward on that whole time period right now. a little bit of news also this morning, lauren. we're learning about a cardinal in britain involved in some controversy decided no not to attend. he will tell us about that? >> reporter: martha, this is unprecedented. this really doesn't happen. we're in a season of unprecedented events. there will be one less cardinal attending the conclave, cardinal keith o'brien of scotland, england's highest ranking catholic leader is resigning as archbishop in the wake of allegations of misconduct. british newspapers report that o'brien was accused by three current priests or one former priest acting inappr
, and he looks frail, looks old, but he seemed to be enjoying himself. john paul ii is very much a more engaging pope and not as much as a private man as benedict xvi is. he will leave here tomorrow around this time, by helicopter, and he will go to castle gandolpho and come back to the vatican in his retirement. he'll go into isolation, he's chosen that for himself. the vatican garden cottage as it were, it's not particularly comfortable, i'm told, i haven't been in, but it is somewhere he can spend his twilight years as it were, and he's 85 years old, let's remember that, in peace and reflecting on where he is, who he is, and how far he's come. today was very much an occasion of reflection for the 100,000 or so people who were here, brooke. it was absolutely amazing. we were up there, right at vatican city there and it was a sense of quiet, even though there are over 100,000 people there, so i say, a time of reflection and peace for so many of the faith. brooke? >> and history being made and now less than 24 hours from now, where you are in rome, becky anderson, my thanks to you. >>>
appointed by his predecessor, john paul ii. and the two of them in terms of dock tin were right down the -- doctrine were right down the line together. the pope is going to be one of them right? we really can't expect any major changes in the direction of the church or can we? >> well, we're certainly hoping for sister simone campbell. >> bill: she's got my voice. >> unfortunately, she's not of the right gender as per vatican rules. hopefully some day that will change. >> bill: it has to be a priest. therefore has to be a man. >> correct. >> bill: if is one of these -- we've talked before about -- and i've written about some of the things the church i think has to do something about allowing priests to get married. has to do something about allowing women to be ordained, just for starters. you know, what are the chances we'll get out of this group of 115, a pope who will go in that direction? >> i think your instincts are right that there's a lot of group think going on in the conclave. a lot of folks appointed to positions of authority based on their loyalty to the institution less
the kind of italian curia that is the traditional source of popes until really pope john paul. and i think we'll end up with a similarly conservative pope. >> yeah, reverend al asked me during the commercial break what i thought. not that i would know anything about who's going to be the next pope. but one thing's for certain. given the last two popes' selection of cardinals throughout the world, they are all invariably quite conservative. so the next pope is going to, more probably than not, be similarly conservative. it's a bag job, the college of cardinals. they have rigged the deck. they have rigged the deck. >> but what you'll have, too -- >> spoken like a true catholic. >> you could have the first african pope. you could have the first latino pope. but ironically, those guys would be very conservative. you know, the growth of the church in africa is a very conservative movement. the same thing in latin america, although there's a bit of a protestant refirmation. he will be very conservative. >> everybody's talking about the possibility of an african pope. i just don't think it's goin
discrimination. but being a judge, and it's a pretty good job to have, think of my colleague, justice john paul stevens who remain on the court until he was 90, and is still an avid golfer and tennis player, has recently written a book, not about himself, but about the five chiefs that he had known from the time he was a law clerk until the time he retired from the court. so, next question. [laughter] >> justice ginsburg, you've had an amazing career and are leaving your legacy in the law. looking back on your life, although there's still more to do, but looking back on what you have done so far, is there anything you would do differently? >> it's a question, and i don't ask myself, and i'll give you two pieces of advice i was given in that regard. when i was a brand-new judge on the d.c. circuit, one of my senior colleagues said ruth, i've been at this business a long time, and one thing i'd like to embark to you, do your best job in each case, but when it's over, when the opinion is out, don't look back. don't worry about things that have passed. go on to the next case, and give it your all.
this passed the congress, the republican congress, it passed with votes from john boehner, and paul ryan said when it happened he got 98% of what he wanted. only republicans gave us the sequester, only they can stop it. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: whatever, jim. jim is so competitive jacki. in the parking structure he's like ha ha, i got in the building first! >> into the building first? >> really? that does it for you? >> you compete about that? >> stephanie: love letter for jacki. dear steph. huge fan and podcast subscriber. everyone involved makes the show fantastic. you guide the show along masterfully. chris is more than he's given credit for. silliness occurs when healthcare geek jacki is in the studio with us. any way to have her there with you more often? >> well, there would be if jim ward didn't constantly sexually harass her. >> there is that whole restraining order. >> i'm several feet away from her. >> that's what the restraining order says. >> stephanie: why can't we have nice things. here she is in the current news cent
must be an expert in medicine. i would wonder why he assumes that he knows more than people like john or paul, the nobel prize winner in economics. and it seems to me that sequestration is more a blackmail issue. guest: again, sequestration was the mechanism used by the president, the white house, in order to get the bill passed that raised the debt limit in august 2011. if anyone's dealing with blackmail, i reference your call to the white house, please, because they were the ones who came up with this idea. the president thought it was a bad idea, had the ability to veet oh the bill in august 2011, but it was passed under his signature. he signed it and went on vacation, if you'll remember, went to his 50th birthday party, if i recall correctly. look, paul drugman and i probably disagree about almost everything except the call of day. host: the caller may have missed the introduction of you. er a doctor. give us a little bit of your background. guest: well, i am a physician. i went to the university of texas medical school at houston,graduated in 1977, did my residency in a obstetri
. the republicans embraced it, voted for it. paul boehner voted for it. eric cantor, 174 republicans, john boehner said, i am so happy, i've got 98% of what i want. though passed it. now, they don't care if the rock falls on their head that's the bottom line. the super committee didn't do its job. now the rock's about to fall. they say, hey, let it fall. woodward is wrong. this is john boehner's baby. i don't want to get in a blame game etee. this is for our country. he no responsible. no responsible member of congress would let this happen to real americas. we are going to take a little time out. talk more about this later. time out to talk usmc arizona with chris orr from the atlantic coming up next. >> this is "the bill press show." live on your radio and current tv iq will go way up. (vo) current tv gets the converstion started weekdays at 9am eastern. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. >> you are. >> the troops love me. (vo) tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >> you're welcome current tv audience for the visual c
. this is what paul clement is arguing. >> bill: what john boehner argues. you don't need any special rights. you don't need any help or you don't need any particular support. >> listen, i've been called special since i was a small child. i'm not going to tell you what that meant. but i'll take the special rights. [ laughter ] >> bill: i love your comments on this, 1-866-55-press. you know, on public policy issues, we've learned it always takes a long time, you know, to get to the right place. but i must -- it has taken a long time on same-sex marriage. but in the last 12 months, maybe, right it has moved so fast. i think it just has my head spinning. in the right direction. i think it is great. for the president of the united states last year to come out in support of same-sex marriage. now for this big group of republicans to do so. and it was only ten years ago or less that republicans were using this as a -- against every liberal, every democrat in the country. >> absolutely. if you need any evidence of discrimination right, it was those -- it is now -- i think 38 39 states have bans against
to stop this is not the way to win friends or influence people by dropping drone missiles. john: we have an audience to has questions but i realize i mentioned these young congressmen i've left out and paul -- rand paul is seeill as libertarian as you? gimmicky is the most libertarian in the senate. that is good. he has been exposed to the good ideas but i will not do the comparison with. >> how are you tonight? one what did you learn running for president?i >> have enough people double check and count the votes to make sure you get a fair shake. but liberty is alive and well and i love the fact young people will respond to a libertarian message and self-reliance and a responsibility and sound money and the young people were especially excited to have a different form policy to not aggravates. i've learned to better off that i was pessimistic to think i might not recharge the anybody but i reached a significant number. john: 2.1 million. >> for more years of obamawe and we have seen his record re on civil liberties and the constitution. what will it take for obama supporters to realize a
think he's said that? john reed has said that and paul volcker and many people who you spend time with. >> are you asking me why -- >> what do you think is -- >> well, paul volcker actually said something slightly different as you know. he has advocated the volcker rule, and i don't know the volcker rule, what it means, because nobody's defined it yet. and the reason, as you know, is that it is a very -- it is a line that will only be ultimately arbitrary. so, it's an issue that a lot of people engage with. i'll stick with what i said a moment ago. the focus is right. >> right. >> the focus of too big to fail is right. we had fannie mae and freddie mac. the question of how to address it i think is massively more complicated than these kinds of relatively in my opinion, limited proposals. >> right. >> i'll just say once again, i think it's really important, if you're going to get into this question of too big to fail, you have to try to figure out, if i take the risk away from here, where is that risk going to go and how do i deal with that? and i don't think anybody's come up with a go
so even john boehner will understand it all. this bill behind me was passed by house republicans in may of 2012. it was designed by wisconsin congressman paul ryan. remember him? and of course it had cuts to programs like food stamps and medicaid instead of military spending. the bill's dead. it died when the 112th congress came to an end. here is another dandy that they say they passed. this was passed as part of john boehner's failed plan b fiscal cliff package. this one is also dead. and so let's recap. the republicans have exactly zero bills in this session, the 113th congress to avoid what we're facing on friday, sequestration. the house needs to introduce a bill before it can go to the senate. but john boehner is too busy saying tough guy words and blaming democrats. i think the secretary of homeland security summed it up best yesterday during a question-and-answer session. >> what impact would sequestration, were it to happen, have on the department? >> you know, i've been in government and public service a long time, 20 years almost. i have never seen anything like this.
that as opposed to some cuts to the national institutes of health. wolf? >> erin mcpike, thanks. joe johns and rene marsh, thanks to you. >>> rand paul says these forced budget cuts simply don't go far enough. i'm going to be speaking with him later about it. i'm filling in for anderson cooper on ac 360 right here on cnn. much more coming up here in "the situation room" as well. >>> meanwhile, a surprise announcement by president obama. the man who led allied forces in afghanistan is retiring from the united states military. the marine corps john allen was on track to become nato's next supreme commander but he's stepping down because of health issues in his family. the president calls general allen one of america's finest military leaders. now he will retire. >>> let's get to one of the most daring robberies we've seen in some time. thieves dressed as police broke into an airport in europe, got into a plane's cargo hold, and got away with some $50 million in diamonds. cnn's tom foreman has the details which sound straight out of a film from hollywood. what happened here, tom? >> you're ri
for the people he elected to serve. he was an inspirational focus point for people like paul and i. we were kids, young men and women when president reagan piqued our interest. >> a lot of people think john boehner will retire in 2014. do you think paul ryan would be a good speaker of the house? >> he would be an exceptional leader, whatever he might be. paul ryan does great things. >> i am getting the hook. scott walker, thank you for being here. [applause] >> you will tag team out with a bill right now. notice to sue proved quick burst to see you. -- nice to see you. >> nice to see you. we are here in washington, governor sam brownback from kansas who is trying to make the trek from topeka. the weather has slowed him down. we will finish with you, governor. >> they have 10 inches of snow that had them. >> he has an excused absence. we will finish with you today. thank you for joining us. i have been talking to the other governors, the same issue. the federal impact of the states and what is happening in the states. heading towards march 1 is the sequester, automatic edger cuts will go into eff
paul ryan. had things gone differently on election night he would be sitting behind president romney but he is member of the house of receipt identifies. you see john kerry, long time senator from massachusetts and new secretary of state, a job many say he was born and bred for. you can see at the top of the any, the gallery. it's fascinating some of the people in the gallery. it's become now some would say a flag show, some would say a kind of theater that members of congress, the first lady, they bring a variety of people to sit in the gallery. everybody from gabrielle giffords, the victim of a terrible shooting. here you see first lady michelle obama. somewhat interesting in her box, i don't see the person there, a young 20-year-old man named alan alaman who is an illegal immigrant from nevada. he is someone the country, he is one of so-called dream act people. he was brought to the country as a child. president has ordered that there be no deportation of any of those people who were brought to the country as illegal immigrants, as children who are either in school or in the u.s.
to make of this ted cruz. >> ted cruz was elected by a group of tea party maniacs. i get why rand paul does it another tea party crazy elected by tea party crazies. but john mccain who once was a maverick, you know, the creator of mccain-feingold, somebody who usually is moderate i don't expect that from him. this is just not -- this is just not john mccain behavior. >> it's kind of sick i think what john mccain has done with himself over a couple of different issues but specifically the chuck hagel thing. this was a guy that said chuck hagel would be qualified to serve in any leadership role. i don't get it. mccain looks silly in all of this. >> completely silly. at the end of the day, it makes me big the question like john, mccain what are you thinking? you were such a legend somebody who people applauded and looked up to. you could have had a career like ted kennedy. could have. but you are just squandering it, absolutely, positively squand squandering it. i remember when teddy passed and they had the people on the hill people lining the streets of the arli
through a republican primary. maybe they carve up the reasonable vote and rand paul walks through without looking. >> we know that jeb bush won the election in 2008. >> john mccain -- >> he also won, he took a hard line against immigration but was seen as a liberal republican earlier in his year. >> earlier in his career. >> at different points in his career. we tend to believe that moderate republicans can not get through the process but they have shown that it ends up happening. >> do they not get through the process, at the expense of, and look at the last republican primary as the example, by the time mitt romney picked up the nomination after the 112 republican debates that we were judged to. >> and somewhere to the right of herman cain >> i want do not think it's fair to paint taall the republicans with the mitt romney brush. >> the point that was being made is that even if you are not as. right leaning, as some would have you -- some folks may have you to -- some may try to paint you to be. by the time the primary is over, you have really come across -- >> it's true for both partie
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)